CHAPTER 6

SADLER'S DISILLUSIONMENT

I shall now show how Sadler was taken by celestial agencies. They removed him from allegiance to church bodies, and to human organizational structures. Little was Sadler aware how he was being prepared for more important service to God and to his fellow man.
 

Disillusionment with the world produces alterations in attitude which prepares a human mortal for more profound insights into spiritual realities. For those who can benefit, it reduces naivete and strengthens character, while it molds the mind to more rigorous assessments and firm decisions.
 

The information from the preceding chapter shows Sadler's status within the Seventh Day Adventist Church. He was a rising star. At the age of 23 he initiated the Life Boat journal, and a year later was in full charge of the Life Boat Mission in Chicago. In the two years between 1899 and 1901 he contributed more than 60 articles, sermons, and reports to the two top official publications of the Church. By the time he was 26 he was a member of important Church committees, a Trustee of John Harvey Kellogg's International Medical Missionary and Benevolent Association, and an important influence on the thinking and developing theology of the Church.
 

At this point Dr. Kellogg asked Sadler to become administrator of the Medical Mission work in San Francisco. Sadler's reasons for accepting the new position were several. After the death of their first son as an infant, his wife Lena urged him to enter the medical field. This desire by both William and Lena was heavily influenced by their intimate association with Kellogg's medical work, and the opportunity to strike new paths in social service to others. The Cooper Medical College was in San Francisco; they could attend there. Also, Ellen White was then living in the environs of San Francisco; they could become personally acquainted with her. As a dynamic and highly energetic person, Sadler should be able to assume the manifold duties.
 

However, the environment in San Francisco was considerably different from that of Battle Creek or Chicago. Dr. Kellogg was a major influence on policy in the Midwest medical operations. Although a follower of Seventh Day Adventists doctrines, nevertheless he was his own man. His initiatives had developed the Battle Creek Sanitarium into a world famous operation. Kellogg personally opened the Chicago Mission activities. But already, in the 1890's, major difficulties were being encountered in relationships between the relatively uneducated "Church" ministers, the general body of believers, and the more sophisticated Doctors and workers in the Medical Missions. There was a distrust by the "Church" body of the more secular Medical work. Much of this dichotomy revolved around the influence of Ellen White on the one side, and John Harvey Kellogg on the other. Mrs. White was the prophetess of the Seventh Day Adventist Church; she carried powerful theological and spiritual influence. On the other hand Dr. Kellogg had built a strong reputation for physical cures and healthy life styles derived from Seventh Day Adventist philosophies.
 

The relationships were complicated by the respective ages and experiences of the Kelloggs and the Whites. For example, John Harvey Kellogg, the two White sons, J. Edson White and his brother William C. White, and Jennie Trembly, under the general supervision of Merritt Kellogg, John Harvey's older half brother, had studied together for six months at Trall's medical school in Florence Heights, New Jersey. Furthermore, Willie White had won the heart of the fair lady whom John Harvey Kellogg desired for a wife. James and Ellen White later sponsored young Kellogg; they gave him $1,000 to attend the Bellevue Hospital Medical College in New York City, a considerable sum in those days(1). These life relationships influenced the manner in which the two driving personalities impacted upon the Church; their intimate histories made them less objective about their personal differences and consequent influence upon the general body of believers.
 

These personal relationships among the Whites and the Kelloggs also impacted on Sadler. When he married Lena Kellogg he became a nephew to Dr. Kellogg, and a member of the Kellogg family. When the Sadler's moved to California they became intimate with the Whites, visiting many times in the home of Willie White, where his mother lived. Sadler became close friends with Willie.
 

The two most influential persons in Sadler's life were John Harvey Kellogg and Ellen White. To the one he owed his opportunity for contribution to the Seventh Day Adventist Church; to the other he owed his spiritual allegiance. But now bitter contest was developing between the two.  The Church was in the midst of internal strife and warfare. When Kellogg asked Sadler to head up the Mission efforts in San Francisco in 1901 he became Kellogg's personal representative. Furthermore, the environment in San Francisco was different from Battle Creek or Chicago. Sadler was moving from a situation where Kellogg had control to one where the Church and Ellen White had control. Thus Sadler's every act was under intense scrutiny.
 

Kellogg's choice was not without careful thought. Sadler had established himself among the Church body. His spiritual allegiance could not be questioned. But as Kellogg's representative the microscopic eyes of Church leaders became focused upon him. He also had personal attributes which rubbed many of those leaders the wrong way; he wanted to do things expertly and professionally -- the right way. He was disciplined, he was acute in his thinking, he was loyal, and he was eager to make the Medical Mission work an important contribution to the Church.
 

He was not a heartless man. His personality, his marriage to Lena, his shaping within the Church -- all contributed to a natural heartfelt concern for others. The Seventh Day Adventists promoted love among their "Brothers" and "Sisters." Their many benevolent and charitable projects were motivated from their concerns for fellow man. But Sadler had a desire to be the best. He wanted to do a good job. His successful experience in Chicago helped push him to that desire. Unfortunately, this attribute exposed him to the personal jealousies and envies of ministers within the Church. They faulted him for his ambitions, and for his extravagance in shaping the San Francisco Medical Mission.
 

In many policy statements throughout her life Ellen White had emphasized the benefits of Church operations "in the country." She stressed that Sanitariums, printing establishments, and other Church organizations should be placed in "the country." It was her urging which led to the move of Battle Creek College to Berrien Springs, Michigan, and her influence which located many of the California operations "in the country." This led to another basic dichotomy between "Church" policies and Medical Mission goals. At one point she urged Sadler to move the Medical Mission work out of San Francisco. He expostulated with her on the impossibility of reaching the unfortunate souls of the city from operations in the country. Later, after he had settled in La Grange, Illinois, which he called "a quiet country suburb," he admitted her wisdom of living in the country. He emphasized that he spent only eighteen cents a day on rail commute to downtown Chicago. But by that time, he was no longer serving the "forgotten souls" of the city.
 

Sadler's efforts to create an efficient and important Mission operation in San Francisco must be weighed in the context of west coast Church management. San Francisco was under the Church; because of Church experiences with John Harvey Kellogg in Battle Creek and Chicago, Medical Mission work would not be tolerated outside that control. Kellogg would not, by any means, build an operation in San Francisco that would have independent control, as he had in Battle Creek and Chicago. Therefore, all of Sadler's decisions were weighed by the San Francisco ministers against that criterion. The personal repercussions can be measured by his use of letterheads, and the contents of his correspondence with Willie White. I attach a summary tabulation of all significant letters to Willie and Ellen White which are preserved in the archives of the Seventh Day Adventist Church headquarters in Silver Spring, Maryland.
 

Sadler first became active in San Francisco in August, 1901. He used California Conference letterheads showing him as Superintendent of Young People's work, a Church position. In May, 1902 he then began using a letterhead showing him as President of the San Francisco Medical Missionary and Benevolent Society. Sadler was building an independent operation.  This use of Medical Mission letter heads continued until some point between September 9, and October 12, 1903, when he reverted to the Church letterhead. By that time events in San Francisco caused the Medical Mission to lose identifiable independent status and to become subservient to Church operations.
 

We can follow developments by perusal of the letters. Sadler begins with an optimistic upbeat note and take-charge tone. He first reorganizes the California Young Peoples work to make it more efficient. By May, 1902 he is asking them to contribute financially toward the Mission operations. Other Mission activities included Hydropathic Dispensary and Christian Helping Hand at 916 Laguna St., Helping Hand Mission at 641 Commercial St., Vegetarian Cafe at 755 Market St., the Sanitarium at 1436 Market St., and Visiting Nurses at 995 McAllister St. In a letter dated May 20, 1903 he states, "Our work in the city is getting along nicely. We have a nice corps of workers here at present, and getting it systematized, and getting new workers started, we are getting along nicely, and our workers are having good success." It appears that there was considerable activity and that Sadler was in general charge.
 

Quickly, the Whites feel a concern about his methods and aggressive actions to center work around the Medical Mission, rather than directly under the Church organizations. In July, 1902, and in typical Ellen White fashion, she requests that he justify his actions in writing to demonstrate his "Church" dedication by stating his plans for removal of "old offenders." She wanted more than concentration on the secular concerns of Mission work. This pressure continues into August, 1902. We have no surviving letters between August, 1902 and April, 1903 to follow developments, but we can see that Sadler is busy with administrative concerns. In a letter dated June 3, 1903 we find that he is highly instrumental in assignment of various medical professionals. He is sensitive to relationships with outside medical activities in San Francisco and is striving to keep good relations with that secular community,
 

 

Meanwhile there are repeated references in the letters about J. H. Kellogg. Sadler is doing his best to accommodate the strong personalities, and to emphasize contribution of Kellogg to Seventh Day Adventist spiritual needs. Kellogg had recently published his book, The Living Temple; it was creating momentous concern in the Church about doctrinal issues. Willie White does not fully express his thoughts directly to Sadler, but the thrust of the concern can be seen in his Sept 23, 1903 letter to A. G. Daniells, then President of the SDA General Conference. Refer to notes at the end of this chapter. Kellogg was being accused of pantheism, a concept which undermined several crucial SDA doctrines. Although it was not Kellogg's intent to do so, he inadvertently created a doctrinal crisis; he did not carefully develop the theological ramifications of his remarks before he published. These problems revolved around his statements concerning the personality of God and the divine presence in all living things. Such statements as "there is present in the tree a power which creates and maintains it, a tree-maker in the tree, a flower-maker in the flower" offended Adventist ministers, although most Adventist ministers were willing to believe that Kellogg had not deliberately set out to introduce heresies. Ellen White wrote that there was in pantheism "the beginning of theories which, carried to their logical conclusion, would destroy faith in the sanctuary question and in the atonement." She admitted that she did not believe Kellogg saw this clearly. She went further to state that she did not think "that in laying this new foundation of faith, he was directing his steps toward infidelity."

 

As early as 1898 Ellen White had written letters to Kellogg which pointed in a forceful way what she considered to be errors in the Doctors thinking and blemishes in his character. He was told that "his conversation often tended to cast doubt on fundamental Adventist doctrines, that he should stop undermining the influence of the Adventist ministry, and that he should not harbor thoughts of separating the denomination's medical endeavors from church control."
 

The difficulty with Kellogg was complicated by other factors. His maneuvering to take the Battle Creek Sanitarium out of the hands of legal Church control, his contest with the ministers over control of his cereal food products, jealously guarding that which had become excellent sources of income, which he did not share with the general Church body, and his disagreements with them over health teachings, as well as other matters -- all brought great dissension within the Church. These conflicts had already presented themselves as "warfare" in Chicago before Sadler left for San Francisco.
 

The theological implications of The Living Temple intensified concerns of the Church ministerial body. Something had to be done to remove the Kellogg threats to Church doctrines. Richard Schwarz reviewed the several meetings in which Church leaders attempted to bring Kellogg back into proper doctrinal position, and to reconcile their differences. At the General Conference meeting in Oakland in April, 1903, in executive meetings in Battle Creek later in the month, at a conference of leaders in Washington, DC in October, and a final attempt at Berrien Springs in May, 1904, with Ellen White present, Kellogg repeatedly admitted fault and apologized to the Church. But relations were not good, and insincerity was in more than one heart. As Schwarz stated it, "These men could hardly fail to be aware that the doctor was skeptical of them as a group because, in general, they lacked any formal professional education." In interviews with Schwarz in November, 1960 and December, 1961, Sadler recalled how "At moments of pique Kellogg would ungraciously refer to his clerical associates as a 'cheap ministry,' composed of men 'of very mediocre ability' who retained their influence through the use of 'psychological trickery.'"
 

Sadler grew up under Kellogg. In his impressionable youth, from the age of fourteen, to his first field assignments in Chicago at the age of eighteen, Sadler came to respect and love Kellogg. The mission work in Chicago was immensely successful; Sadler was a major participant.
 

Sadler certainly had comparable expectations when Kellogg asked him to work in San Francisco. The work in Chicago was inspiring to many of its participants. They were a united group, giving of themselves for the downtrodden and helpless of the city. They also were focused in one direction, under Kellogg. The ministerial body did not have direct influence upon the daily Chicago activities; Kellogg was mostly independent in formulating goals. The controversies with the ministerial body had not yet hardened in the 1890's, and influences counter to Kellogg had not yet begun to crystallize.
 

When Sadler moved to San Francisco he unwittingly placed himself into the middle of the controversy. The difficulties within the Church became focused geographically in San Francisco, and symbolically at Sadler's working level. He was Kellogg's representative; with or without foundation, faulting of the Mission work was directed at him.
 

Sadler had personal integrity. He fully and devoutly believed in the doctrines of the Church. Because of Ellen White's role as spiritual leader of the Church, her heavy influence on theology, and Sadler's great respect for her and Church doctrines, he became personally subject to the tensions then developing between the Church factions. In fact, there may have been no other individual who was so personally intimate with both leaders, who held both in such great respect, and who was thus personally torn.
 

Coincident with the leadership meetings with Kellogg, and probably inspired by the ministerial body, Sadler's personal crisis came to a head in October, 1903. The local ministerial group conspired to deprive Sadler of his administrative functions, fearing the structure he was building and, through him, the strength Kellogg was gaining in California. In a letter dated Oct 12, 1903 Sadler pleaded with Willie White to oppose the apparent policy of B. F. Richards, then Vice-President of the San Francisco Medical Mission under Sadler, to destroy the Mission work. By that time he is no longer using the Mission letterhead but has reverted to the California Conference letterhead.
 

For the interests of reporting I provide the complete text of that letter as an attachment to this Chapter. I also provide the text of the following letter, and Willie's reply to both.
 

The great disappointment for Sadler was Kellogg's lack of support. A committee had been formed of three ministers, and of Kellogg, to investigate charges which had been brought against Sadler. These were brought formally in Sabbath meeting, with the Church membership present, certainly a humiliating experience. We do not know the content of the charges; no records exist. They probably revolved around Sadler's seeming independence, and may have used invented incompetence as a pretext. Kellogg did not support Sadler.  He had his own Church position as first priority. These possibilities may be inferred from the two letters to Willie. While Sadler indicates a willingness to forsake formal Mission structure, his complaints show that he was being deprived of all managerial authority. By November he had resigned, for the better interests of the Church. He accepted his fate with humility, feeling he had made mistakes. But by the middle of December he is packing up and leaving San Francisco.
 

Before his departure he sought the advice of Ellen White. In Richard Schwarz's interview with Sadler on Sept 22, 1960 Sadler made remarks which led Schwarz to write: "When the controversy between Kellogg and the Church leaders was at its height, Ellen White showed her concern for the doctor by persuading one of his former close associates, W. S. Sadler, to discontinue his medical studies in San Francisco and to complete them in Battle Creek, where he might be a 'help and encouragement' to Kellogg." See page 364 of Schwarz's dissertation. Although this remark does not capture the full picture in San Francisco it shows the actions of Sadler before making his decision to leave that work, and also Ellen White's concern over Kellogg, a man who was widely influential and important to the Church, whom she had known from his youth, and whom she had brought into the faith when he was still that youth.
 

This experience brought disillusionment to Sadler. Not to his religious beliefs, but to the persons for whom he held such great respect. His letters of early 1904 from Battle Creek show a continuing evangelistic spirit. But then, in the spring, a definite change in tone occurs. Sadler left San Francisco, not because he found himself without a job, but in general disgust. He abhorred the devious intrigue among Church factions, and the lack of personal integrity of those he had held in high regard. He could have continued his medical studies at Cooper College, while remaining active in the local church, and contributing to the Mission work. Willie White had urged him to do so. But his feelings about the betrayal of Richards and Kellogg were more than he could bear in California. As he states in several letters:
 

"In San Francisco I fear my standards and policies would never have been acceptable." -- To Willie White, Apr 7, 1904.
 

"Experiences in the recent past have been such as to make me wish I were off on a farm somewhere and forever delivered of it all." -- To Ellen White, Aug 31, 1904.
 

"I really have seen so much trouble and friction over medical work that I would like to get away from it all if possible." -- To Willie White, Feb 19, 1906 after White pleads for him to return to Church work.
 

Although Sadler broke his loyalty to Kellogg, he continued to believe in the "divine inspiration" of Ellen White. In 1929, in his book The Mind at Mischief, he makes favorable oblique references to her heavenly guidance.
 

The San Francisco experience created a new spiritual orientation in Sadler's life. He no longer trusted the authority of the Church, either from John Harvey Kellogg or Ellen White. By April, 1904 he made up his mind for his new direction. Through acquaintanceships made at Moody Bible School, and because of his scholarly and administrative reputation, he and Lena were offered medical study at the Johns Hopkins Medical facilities in Baltimore. But they rejected the offer in favor of return to the SDA American Medical Mission College in Chicago. Although they could have continued their studies in Battle Creek Sadler elected to remove themselves from proximity to Dr. Kellogg, while still continuing in the SDA environment.  
 

1. The intimate relationship between the Whites and the Kellogg family is surveyed by Richard Schwarz in his John Harvey Kellogg: American Health Reformer.


 


SADLER LETTERS TO THE WHITES
 

1901 TO 1912

From archives of E. G. White Estate
Seventh Day Adventist World Headquarters
12501 Old Columbia Pike
Silver Spring, Maryland

E. P. Moyer Original Tabulation November 12, 1993
Revised Tabulation, January 24, 1997
All letters are to William C. (Willie) White, unless indicated otherwise.
Trivial letters not included except to show Sadler status.



*YPW = Young Peoples' Work
** SFMMABS = San Francisco Medical Missionary and Benevolent Society
Sec = Secretary who typed the letter

 

DATE

LOCATION OR
LETTERHEAD

ADMINISTRATIVE
POSITION

SUBJECT OR NOTES

Aug. 6, 1901

2-pgs.

California
Conference

971 Howard St.
San Francisco
 

Sec=HR

Superintendent

YPW

A policy statement by Sadler for the youth organization. He wants to remove administrative burdens from the youth group by making them auxiliary to the Sabbath School. Expresses concern about previous statements by E. G. White, who apparently wants her hand in decisions. Sadler indicates "take charge" attitude.

May 15, 1902

1-pg.
 

California
Conference

995 McAllister
San Francisco

Sec=HWR

Supt. YPW

Urging Willie to urge Sanderson to move to Honolulu. Shows "take charge" attitude again when he states he believes Willie is "the right man to push it thru." Done in tone of brotherly advice, rather than autocratic manner.

May 29, 1902

1-pg.

San Francisco
Medical Missionary and Benevolent
Society

995 McAllister

General Notice

No Sec.

President,

SFMMABS

Directed to SDA youth throughout California for contributions toward fund to start Dispensary and Treatment Rooms in the basement of SF Church. Also note urging them to join Correspondence School. Shows desire to organize around Medical Mission work when he refers to youth operations being under SFMMABS, a branch of the California Medical Missionary and Benevolent Society.

July 18, 1902

1-pg.

California
Conference

995 McAllister

Sec=RE

Supt. YPW

Cover for copy of letter to a sister, suggesting line of young peoples' work.

July 18, 1902

1-pg

SFMMABS

995 McAllister

Sec=RE

President

SFMMABS

E. G. had requested via Willie that Sadler place in writing his proposed dealings with "old offenders" in the Church. Does so and justifies himself. He has "settled my purpose for life" and "is hungering and thirsting for knowledge how best to do that which God has entrusted to my hands." Tone of letter suggests concern by Ellen and Willie White of Sadler's "take charge" manner, and shows Sadler's sensitivity to their concerns.

Aug. 17, 1902

1-pg.

SFMMABS

995 McAllister

Sec=HR

President

SFMMABS

Indicates busy schedule, and pressures upon him from E. G. and Willie to remove cases of those "who long ago have given up the truth." They want to review what "has been written" before he acts. Shows that he is defending himself against psychological pressure.

April 20, 1903

2-pgs.

SFMMABS
2315 Jackson

Sec=HWR

President

SFMMSABS

Discusses giving room to "Ella" for $15/mo plus a few hours a week toward responsibilities about the house.

May 20, 1903

2-pgs.

SFMMABS

2315 Jackson

Sec=HWR

President

SFMMSABS

Various urgings on Willie: A Dr. Winegar to spend part of her time in health propaganda; Mae Coker to head the Signs movement; Ella is doing nicely in Kindergarten work; heartfelt appeal to accommodate Dr. J. H. Kellogg as a strong and quickly decisive personality.

May 25, 1903

1-pg.

SFMMABS

2315 Jackson

Sec=HR

President

SFMMABS

Responding to Willie's copy of letter from J. H. Kellogg. Now understands Willie's reasons for not going to Medical Missionary Board for handling of Kellogg problem. Willie apparently is trying to win Sadler over to Medical Mission "problems" as perceived by the ministerial body.

June 3, 1903

3-pgs.

SFMMABS

2315 Jackson

Sec=HWR

President

SFMMABS

Discussion of several medical professionals and their contribution to the SFMMABS work, their weaknesses and strengths, their adherence to SDA rules, and movement of individuals in and out of jobs to improve operations according to Church goals. Concerned about relations with secular medical professionals within the city. Expresses desire for "first class, elegantly equipped treatment rooms, in the heart of the city (treatment rooms only)."

Undated

1-pg.

SFMMABS

2315 Jackson

President

SFMMABS

Hand written: obvious follow-up on previous letter. Suggestions for movement of professional personnel to improve operations. Concludes with "There is hope for S.F. in sight!"

Sept. 9, 1903

1-pg.

SFMMABS

2315 Jackson

Sec=HW

President

SFMMABS

Plans for Ella to move out. Kindergarten did not work out because she could not get help she expected. Expresses concern to get Ella into right situation.

Sept. 23, 1903: A letter from Willie White to A. G. Daniells, then president of the Church General Conference, expressing concern for various diverging views developing within different districts of the Church, regarding the Medical Mission work. Worried over contradiction to his mother's Testimonies. He wishes to have Church leaders "...present to our people ways of getting a medical education without taking these long courses." "...The Lord is calling for evangelists, and that nurses can be successful evangelists quite as efficiently and perhaps more freely than certificated physicians." Also discusses J. H. Kellogg's Living Temple, and the contradictions to Church doctrines. His mother refused to look at the book, but listened to passages as he read them to her. She saw letter from David Paulson in which Paulson proposed to substantiate all the theories in the Living Temple by extracts from her writings. Urges Daniells to get Elders Haskell and Butler "to express themselves through the Review regarding those theories which undermine the pillars of our faith."

Oct. 12, 1903

2-pgs.

California

Conference
 

2315 Jackson

Sec=WR

Supt. YPW

Pleading for help from Willie to oppose Bro. Richards policy to destroy the Medical Mission work. Discusses techniques being used. Fero, Brown, Richards, Kellogg are committee. Letter reproduced in full.

Willie replies -- Oct. 13, 1903 -- 1-pg. -- Sec=G -- He does not believe California Conference Committee will tolerate policy of destruction. Letter reproduced in full.

Oct. 25, 1903

1-pg.

California
Conference

2315 Jackson

Sec=HWR

Supt. YPW

Again seeking help from Willie. Intrigue by Richards to take control away from Sadler. Needs help to hold down two churches. Richards launched enterprise in church last Sabbath. Kellogg and Conference Committee are standing behind Richards. Letter reproduced in full.

Oct. 26, 1903 -- 1-pg. -- Willie replies -- (Letter is lacking right hand text.) Willie expresses surprise at Sadler's accusations. Letter reproduced in full.

Nov. 11, 1903

1-pg.

California
Conference

2315 Jackson

Sec=HR

Supt. YPW

He had couple of remarkable letters from Dr. Kellogg. Thinks fighting disposition has departed from Kellogg. For the first time in five years Sadler thinks the battle is over. Urges Willie and others to be friendly with Kellogg. He will be depressed; the enemy will try to discourage him.

Nov. 18, 1903

Handwritten

2315 Jackson

Status Unknown

Thanks Willie for budget of Mrs. Reed. Is thinking over Willie's attitude about Life Boat. Just rec'd good letter from Dr. Kellogg, which breathes a good spirit. Kellogg hopes that E. W. can come to Battle Creek and "help them all get into that position where the work will rightly represent the Master."

Dec. 25, 1903

7 pgs.

Handwritten

Chicago Branch
Battle Creek Sanitarium
 

Enroute to
Battle Creek
from Chicago

None

Sadlers arrived in Chicago Tuesday. Spent all day with Dr. Paulson. Spoke to the workers that evening. Paulson discouraged, thought his work was done, (i.e., no longer useful to the church), etc. "The more we talked over the past, the more we both could see where we had been wrong." Sadler had meeting with Dr. Hunter, Dr. Mortensen, and heads of Depts in Chicago Xmas eve. Discussed specific points in the TESTIMONIES. Expresses loyalty to Willie and EW. Sees his work now as of a personal nature. He and Lena will take rooms in Battle Creek. Chicago Sanitarium will move out to Hinsdale in May. Rumors that EW was shown complete collapse of Battle Creek work and buildings falling down. Expresses dismay that Medical work is not helped out of its wrongs but is to be crushed because of its mistakes.

Willie Letter -- Dec. 31, 1903 -- 4 pgs -- Inquires briefly of Sadler's personal plans. Urges report on spiritual climate at Battle Creek. Describes Kellogg's apparent effort to align himself spiritually with Church work, yet Kellogg aggressively advertises The Living Temple and shows two different sides. Conference Committee has reorganized responsibilities in San Francisco. Elder Taylor will become Chaplain of the Sanitarium, (apparently taking over Sadler's assignment), and also general oversight of the Young People's Work. Comments show that 
E. W. lives with him.

Willie replies to Sadler's Dec 25 letter -- Jan 5, 1904 -- 3 pgs -- Was joyful to hear of Sadler's address to ministers and doctors in Chicago, exhorting them to faithfulness. He states, "I hope our ministers in Illinois will learn to work with the Doctors, and that the Doctors will learn how to work with the ministers." Again expresses his concern for Kellogg's mendacity. Defends his mother against false charges about her "visions" concerning God bringing judgment down on Battle Creek operations.

Jan 12, 1904

15-pgs.

Battle Creek

Letterhead

Sec=FCD

None

His name handwritten beneath listing of medical staff.

He is starting back to school, (AMMC). Rcv'd ltt'r of 12-31 plus another from Willie. WCW wants to know his impression of BC environment. He came to BC "fifteen years ago this summer." He is deeply involved in the great conflict of Testimonies which attack Kellogg and the Medical Mission Work, and his respect for the Testimonies, attempting to ameliorate both sides. He describes great controversy then at BC over these issues. He expresses dedication to both the Testimonies and the Sanitarium work under Kellogg. He "could not turn his back on either of those." It is a "great relief to work for a while without responsibilities" as a simple medical student. He and Lena are located in what used to be Old West Hall of the College on the first floor. He is dedicated to the work that has absorbed his life and will continue in dedication.

Jan. 26, 1904

6-pgs.

Battle Creek

Letterhead

Sec=HWR

None

His name handwritten beneath listing of medical staff.

Again reviews controversy at Sanitarium and conflict within Testimonies. He is exuberant that people are dedicated more than ever to God and the Church. Gives examples of revival meetings, etc. Pleads to keep things out of the secular press. Seems unable to believe that EW and Willie are already affirmed to destroy Kellogg and the Medical Mission work.

Willie White to J. H. Kellogg -- Jan 15, 1904 -- 3 pgs -- Emphasizes new tone of San Francisco medical mission work. Shows that the Whites and ministerial body greatly reassured that work is now in proper hands. "While Dr. and Mrs. Evans and Dr. Upson have less experience than their predecessors, they have kindness of heart, and have cultivated the faculty of working in harmony with their fellow-laborers." Work in San Francisco still surrounded with many perplexities. "The faithful work done by Brother Sadler before he left, and by Dr. Evans, with my earnest assistance, has forewarned the Conference Committee and other brethren who might have been deceived regarding the character of some of the movements in San Francisco which were opposed to the organized (medical mission) work." "I know that our San Francisco work will be crippled without Brother Sadler." Describes other activities to impress upon Kellogg the Lord's blessing. (Emphasis is mine -- EPM. Note White's interposition of his "earnest assistance.")

Willie White to J. H. Kellogg -- Jan 17, 1904 -- 2 pgs -- Acknowledges receipt of Kellogg letter in which Kellogg refers to Brother Sadler, and Willie's letters to the latter, regarding Kellogg's insincerity about the Living Temple controversy. Letter is a carefully styled reprimand for insincerity on the part of Kellogg, and the effect of his insincerity on the secular medical profession, but more importantly, the effect on the body of the Church.

Willie White to Sadler -- Jan 19, 1904 -- 2 pgs -- Expresses regret over Kellogg's professed sincerity on one hand, and continued promotion of the Living Temple on the other. States that he believes Kellogg's sincerity and that someone in BC is betraying him. Brings further complaint that Sr. Rouff reported that Sr. Sadler said that his mother "was not a prophet, had never been a prophet, and had never claimed to be a prophet." He believed someone had misunderstood what Sr. Sadler has said.

Editorial Note: In the following lengthy letter, and others, the importance Willie White held for Sadler and Sadler's possible influence upon the Church can be seen. He would not have spent so much time and space if he did not hold Sadler in high regard.

Willie White to Sadler -- Jan 20, 1904 -- 19 pgs -- Extended reply to Sadler's letter of Jan 12. Is solicitous to Sadler. Reviews various "rumors" then running through the Church, and defends his mothers efforts to provide spiritual direction to Battle Creek and the Church. Lengthy justification for the White and ministerial position regarding the battle then raging. Cites various policies, such as "it had been presented to her that the Sanitarium ought to be farther away from the city, in a location where it could be surrounded with fields and orchards and gardens." "A serious mistake has been made in the plans for rebuilding (the Sanitarium, which burned to the ground in 1902), in the size of the building, and in some of the methods for getting means..."

"For more than fifteen years, the Lord has been giving Mother warnings regarding the evils which could come to our cause as the result of our centering too much in Battle Creek. She has been instructed to warn our people against the placing of too much interests in Battle Creek; against the overdevelopment of the institutions already there; and against the gathering together of a large number of people in one place, making it a Jerusalem-center. These things have been written, and many of them published; but our people seem to ignore the existence of these warnings."

Goes on further to explain apparent contradiction between his mothers earlier blessing on Battle Creek work, and her more recent statements against the policies expressed there. Reviews efforts at the General Conference in 1901 "to harmonize, and to unite in brotherly effort..." Discusses purchase of Battle Creek College buildings for the use of the Medical School, while it would have been better to

"...be removed to some country place, where it would be freed from the detrimental influences which had developed around it in Battle Creek on account of its proximity to the city, and on account of the conflicts and the controversies among the managers of our institutions and in the Battle Creek Church."

"When our International Medical Missionary College has recovered from the detrimental influences of the philosophical theology which have taken such deep hold there during the last year or two..." He would then expect his mother to use "her influence to encourage our medical students to take their training at that institution."

Willie goes on to the Living Temple: "The book was never endorsed by the General Conference; and when it came up for consideration in November, 1902, it was criticized, objected to, and withdrawn by Dr. Kellogg, and afterwards pushed by him, and by the Medical Mission."

"It has been the determination to push this book, and to make prominent its teachings, that have undone the efforts toward reconciliation that have been repeatedly made... ...this effort has been repeatedly frustrated by the determination to push the teachings of "The Living Temple," and to interest all our young people in circulating the book and promulgating its doctrines... ...that at the very time when Dr. Kellogg is endeavoring to take his stand on the side of truth and harmony, the enemy of truth should succeed in leading his fellow workers to send out hundreds of copies of a circular which contains such glaring falsehoods..."

Willie goes on, exhorting Sadler to remain true to the faith.

Jan. 26, 1904

6-pgs.

Battle Creek

Letterhead

Sec=HWR

None

His name handwritten beneath listing of medical staff.

Reports on Revival then in progress and its positive effects on strengthening the faith at the Sanitarium. Many nurses and workers who had been advised to leave the Sanitarium were aroused to stay after their fresh spiritual experience. Sadler does not believe the mighty efforts of the past thirty years, with the toil and self-sacrifice of thousands of people, will be lost. He believes the Lord is behind the work as much as ever. The Lord is not fitful; he does not change his mind. "I do not think that because we change, the Lord changes." He prays every day that something will happen to bring this thing (warfare) to an end.

"I believe, Brother White, that we all must go to the Lord, and ask Him to deliver us from this miserable situation. I believe there are grave faults to be corrected, and dangerous things to be righted, but I fear that if we do not succeed in accomplishing this work with more of the Spirit of Christ, and more prayer, and more brotherly love, in the end we will have done the Message as much harm as the original wrongs that we are seeking to correct."

Jan 26, 1904

3-pgs

Battle Creek Letterhead

Sec = HWR

None

His name handwritten beneath listing of medical staff.

Response to Mrs. Roouf who offered report undermining Lena's credibility about EW as a prophet. Quotes passage where EW said she was not a prophet or prophetess, but a messenger with a message. He illustrates his strong defense of EW. Explains his methods in teaching and preaching. Defends Dr. Kellogg.

Jan. 31, 1904

10-pgs

Battle Creek

Letterhead

Sec=HWR

None

His name handwritten beneath listing of medical staff.

More defense of the Testimonies, and his personal labors in support of EW. "I do not believe you and your mother are working against things here." He does not regard rumors brought by Willie's inquiry. He works to obtain God's favor while others criticize and stand idly by. He repeats criticisms, such as "BC too large." Continues to defend Kellogg. Believes that Willie, in long letters, is trying to win him over.

Willie to Sadler -- Feb 10, 1904 -- 2 pgs -- Willie is joyful over Sadler's honesty. "I will only tell you that I have been cheered by what you write, and that I esteem it a great privilege to permit Brethren Daniells, Prescott and others to read what you have written."

Willie to Sadler -- Feb 14, 1904 -- 1 pg -- "... I can assure you of my hearty interest in whatever affects your welfare. I should be pleased to see you complete your medical course at Johns Hopkins in Baltimore..." Exclaims over wonderful possibilities there (Baltimore) for medical missionary work. "Please tell me, when you have time, more about your plans, and how much it will mean to you to additional expense. If I can do anything to help you secure the necessary means, I shall be glad to do it. ...I think I would take pleasure in mentioning it to one or two personal friends who might become interested to help you carry out plans that would be a blessing to you and to others." (Shows Sadler's uncertainty of location for continuing medical education.)

Feb. 15, 1904

1-pg.

Battle Creek

Letterhead

Sec=R

None

His name handwritten beneath listing of medical staff.

Acknowledges letter from Willie. Does not respond directly to Willie's offer. Will help Willie to "counteract the influence of any such methods."

Feb. 21, 1904

1-pg.

Battle Creek

Letterhead

Sec=P

None

His name handwritten beneath listing of medical staff.

Sadler response to Willie's report of complaints against Bro. Tenney. After inquiry Sadler does not believe they have any foundation. Illustrates visit by Dr. Van Sommeren from Venice and his charm with BC Sanitarium. Is doing his best to help medical students fight battles.

March 9, 1904

1-pg.

Battle Creek

Letterhead

Sec=P

None

His name handwritten beneath listing of medical staff.

Continues to reassure Willie of good spirit at BC. He will leave for Chicago in a few weeks. Was in Chicago last Sabbath. They are going to rent a place on the West Side. Whole class will live with Lena and him. He and his wife are trying to make up lost time at medical school but find work at AMMC twice as hard as Cooper in SF. Letter shows he now has concrete plans.

April 7, 1904

3-pgs

Battle Creek

Memo head

Handwritten

None

New tone in writing. He came up to BC from Chicago Monday night (4-4-04) because Lena had pneumonia. He is returning to Chicago Sunday (4-10-04). He has no doubt the Lord wanted them to return to BC. "In San Francisco I fear my standards and policies would never have been acceptable." "Will always be glad to hear from you and know how the work goes at St. Helena and on the coast." Is a definite demarcation in attitude. Apparently Sadler's decision in life direction has now crystallized.

On August 1, 1904 Ellen White addressed a letter to David Paulson, William Sadler, A. T. Jones, and Brother Waggoner. It was a maneuver on her part to deflect the growing dangers within the Church. She represents "visions of the night," and singles out Paulson and Sadler. "You are beloved of God but have not been making straight paths for your feet." "The one to whom you have yielded respect (Kellogg) has refused to accept, and follow the counsel of God..." "With legal bonds he has bound up the interests of My cause. These bonds must be broken, and you must use your influence to see that they are broken." (Kellogg had created a corporation for the rebuilding of the Sanitarium which effectively prevented the Church from controlling that Battle Creek operation.) Speaking from her "vision" she goes into a tirade against Kellogg and the Living Temple, and urges those men to "cut loose."

Aug. 31, 1904

2-pgs.

Life Boat
Mission

Chicago

Sec=R/S
 

Treasurer

Pastor

Response to Ellen White "communication." He has not been in Battle Creek since April. He would prefer to talk with her personally; he hardly knows how to write it. "Experiences of the recent past have been such as to make me wish I were off on a farm somewhere and forever delivered of it all." He and Lena desired to complete their medical studies within a year, but when they saw the needy fields in the city, decided to postpone their medical studies for another year to give them more time to gospel work.

Mar. 23, 1905

3-pgs

Life Boat
Mission
 

Chicago

Sec=R/S

Treasurer

Pastor

To EW. This one is warm, with brief account of their work. He illustrates her advice to live in the country while working in the city. They now live in La Grange and commute via train to Chicago for nine cents each way. Hinsdale building under renovation, to be completed May 1st. Life Boat Mission to move May 1st. "Mrs. Sadler sends love, and neither of us has forgotten the many little pleasant visits we had at your home while working on the Coast. You will never know how much they meant to us."

Nov. 21, 1905

1-pg

38 Calendar Ave.
La Grange

Handwritten

None

Sadler discovers from the Herald that Willie will be in College View and requests that he stop in. He has many things to discuss.

Jan. 24, 1906

6-pgs

38 Calendar Ave.
La Grange

Handwritten on memo pad at dispensary between seeing patients

None

Met with Willie in Chicago a few weeks ago. Willie questioned the wisdom of two years in surgery and postgraduate work. They turned down an offer at Hinsdale because they could not accept the conditions. Are borrowing money to complete medical studies within one year. Other medical opportunities are opening. Dr. Sarah Hackett Sevenson arranged for Lena to spend some time with Dr. Kelly at Johns Hopkins in Baltimore. After graduation they want to be free to go where the Lord may direct. Lena's sister Anna Kellogg will remain with them. She has admirable qualifications.

Feb. 19, 1906

5-pgs

38 Calendar
La Grange

Handwritten

None

He has excellent surgery opportunities in Chicago, otherwise they would have gone to Baltimore for one year. Will not provide medical support for Hinsdale. Thinking of self-supporting medical missionary work in some new field. Did not "consider such a course until all of our recent troubles." "I really have seen so much trouble and friction over medical work that I would like to get away from it all if possible."

March 30, 1906 -- Another Ellen White letter TO THOSE WHO ARE PERPLEXED REGARDING THE TESTIMONIES RELATING TO THE MEDICAL MISSION WORK: Claims she recently saw in vision a large crowd of people which included Dr. Kellogg and Elders Jones, Tenney, Taylor, Paulson, Sadler and Judge Arthur with many of their associates. Another attempt to persuade minds to bring their allegiance fully to herself and the Testimonies.

Willie to Sadler -- April 11, 1906 -- 1 pg -- Again inquires of Sadler's plans, and urges him to Paradise Valley Sanitarium. "It is far away from the turmoil, and needs the very work that you and Sister Sadler could do."

Apr. 26, 1906

14-pgs

38 Calendar
La Grange

Sec=HWR

None

Celebrated pleading letter to EW. Pours out his heart about the Testimonies and the challenges which have been brought against them. Definite change in thinking about their validity. Letter reproduced in full in following chapter.

Apr. 30, 1906

3-pgs

38 Calendar
La Grange

Sec=R

None

Sr. White wrote above letter, mentioning Sadler among others, asking, if they had difficulties, to write to her. He was unaware of this letter until he saw a copy at Battle Creek. He explains this to Willie. He is troubled by the manner of EW. He would not respond except his name was explicitly mentioned. He is contracted for one year in La Grange, and will not separate from that commitment. Otherwise he might "leave the continent and get away from all this thing." If his response forces him out of the "organization" he will go quietly into private practice. He will withdraw sorrowfully, without malice, and work for his fellowman. He cannot understand how he was drawn into this. (Clearly shows that he wants to distance himself from Church warfare.)

From Ellen White to David Paulson and Elder W. S. Sadler -- June 14, 1906 -- Once again she attempts to justify her position. "I am glad that these (California) sanitarium properties have come into the possession of our brethren and sisters of the Southern California Conference. For year we worked at a disadvantage; but now I am so thankful that in the providence of God man facilities have been placed within our reach." (Meaning out of the hands of the Medical Missions.) She goes on to complain about the "twistings and connivings and misrepresentations of the Word," and of "false science."

July 5, 1906

3-pgs.

38 Calendar
La Grange

Sec=R

None

Response to EW limited response of June 14. It reached the Sadler's right at the time of their graduation exercises. She feared responding for the possible trouble it might make. He wrote as he did because she requested it. No one knew of his response except Dr. Paulson. He is firm that they are awaiting opportunities for advanced work in the medical institutions of Chicago. He also has offer for work at Johns Hopkins in Baltimore. He "spent two years in Mr. Moody's Chicago school ten years ago," where he met some of those people.

Willie to Sadler -- Two letters -- July 10, 13, 1906 -- Willie attempts to explain corrections to E.G. book, Christ Our Savior. He apologizes for failure to provide Sadler with copy of EW June 14 letter. Willie is surprised that his mother would write defending herself. It has always been her policy not to do so. Again he urges Sadler to "get away entirely from old surroundings and the old controversies which seem to center at Battle Creek and in Chicago." He goes on, "No, my brother, these controversies will never drive you out of the denomination."

Jan 11, 1907

2-pgs

100 State St.

Handwritten

None

He is sending manuscript of HEALTH AND HEALING. He wants Willie's response on "any passages that may not be clear on 'theological' lines." Chapter 1 is Miracles, Marvels and Mysteries.

Feb. 7, 1907

2-pgs.

38 Calendar

Sec=R

None

Willie replied to the Jan 11 with a long letter dated Jan 24. Sadler work well under way at 100 State Street in Chicago. Some practice in La Grange. Regular office hours at Dispensary in the Stock Yard district. Bro. Van Dorn will stay with the Mission another year. He (Sadler) won't have anything to do with the Medical School unless he has a free hand. Hinsdale is full. He is just about isolated from the denominations as if he were dead except for letters from Willie and Bro. Wilcox. God knows in his heart he did not turn his back on the work he started years ago, of the Third Angel's Message to the world. He is doing more and more surgery each month without loss of a case. Prospects are that he will be doing more and more through the coming year. Yesterday he saw the State Board examination; much to his surprise he was secured the highest grade, 89, except for three others of that grade, all from Rush Medical College. His prospects for the Chautauqua lecture circuit look good.

Aug. 28, 1907

1-pg.

100 State St

Handwritten

None

He is requesting Willie to respond to mss. if at all possible.

Sept. 11, 1907

2-pgs.

100 State St.

Handwritten

None

Confirms that they will spend the summer outside the city on Chautauqua Circuit. He and Lena each teach a class at Medical College, otherwise work is entirely with "Gentiles." They are no longer connected with work at Hinsdale. In two weeks he begins his Hydratic Clinic.

Oct. 16, 1907

2-pgs.

100 State St.

Sec=PW

None

"By December first if all goes well we hope to be rich and increased in goods in our neighborhood." Expecting a new chair of hydrotherapy in the Post Graduate Medical School of Chicago. This attracts about half of all physicians who come to Chicago for post-graduate work. He begins a regular course Nov. 1. Today he starts a course in hygiene at the Dunkard's School of Chicago. 50 hrs a year. Other Drs. took over his duties at Hinsdale; he is now completely in private practice. His office time is regular but he wishes to concentrate on the educational work which has opened. Next summer is contracted for Chautauqua, and Lyceum for the winter.

Jan. 5, 1908

2-pgs.

100 State St.

Sec=PW

None

Discusses mss for book; awaits response. Wants it to be theological sound as well as scientific. Feels it is unique. Three weeks ago today they had nine-pound baby boy. On Dec. 14 he was elected Professor of Hydro and Physiologic Therapeutics at the post-graduate school of Chicago. Time is taken up with practice, lecturing in the city, and teaching.

Nov. 12, 1909

1-pg.

100 State St.

Sec=EEU

Director

Chicago Institute of Physiologic Therapeutics.

Thanks Willie for religious books and Ministry of Healing and Steps to Christ. Nothing could have been more important for religious welfare. 

April 5, 1910

1-pg.

100 State St.

Sec=EU

Director

Sends copy of The Science of Living to Willie, with his compliments.

Nov. 6, 1910

2-pgs.

100 State St.

Sec=HCF

Director

He is pretty much isolated from the denomination family. Chautauqua keeps him busy in the summer. He expects to attend General Conference in the Spring before summer lectures begin. His work is becoming more and more surgical. Some difficult cases but has not lost one. "I have had a very exceptional, and to me, a very remarkable experience."

(Editorial note: This was a major moment in Sadler's life. He was now convinced he was dealing with more than a mere psychological phenomenon in the Sleeping Subject.)

Dec. 18, 1910

7-pgs.

100 State St.

Sec=HCF

Director

Plea for Dr. Paulson who, in spite of his outspoken manner, is a true servant in the denomination. Willie characterized him as a "freak of Providence." Sadler feels "this denomination can do without my services alright and for that reason I think the Lord has set me on the outside." In his isolated position he will keep in touch with his brethren even though they do not keep in touch with him. But Paulson needs the denomination. Sadler is anxious that "our people" treat Paulson differently from the way they treated him. He was little loss to the work, but Paulson would be a bigger loss.

Jan. 23, 1911

3-pgs.

100 State St.

Sec=HCF

Director

Willie responded Jan 16, requesting permission to use portions of Sadler's reflections on Paulson which he sent Willie in confidence. He felt his communication was too intimate to pass around, but opens restricted use. Sadler just completed work on "The Physiology of Faith and Fear." Those who know the Third Angels Message cannot permit Dowie and Mrs. (Mary Baker) Eddy and their kin to deceive the world in wholesale fashion. Advance sales look good.

May 25, 1912

2-pgs.

32 N. State St.

Handwritten

  

Still shows interest in SDA work. Wants to contribute. Busy since return from Europe. 

In response, Willie wants Sadler to contribute to Loma Linda school.


Letter from Sadler to W. C. White


On California Conference Letterhead
301 San Pablo Avenue

2315 Jackson St.
San Francisco
Oct 12, 1903

Elder W. C. White
Sanitarium, Cal.

 

Dear Brother White,

 

I wish you would go up and have a talk with Dr. Evans. I talked with him today, but learned more about the things we talked over, after he had gone. Elder Fero was over in the city and had a long talk with Dr. Buchanan and Dr. Brighouse, and we learned still more about Bro. Richards' policy of destruction concerning our organized work in San Francisco.
 

It is very apparent that he has worked up a strong influence on the Conference Committee and over in Oakland, against our work; in fact, Fero told the doctors that he had gotten a lot of influence behind him. He has declared war on Dr. Buchanan, Dr. Brighouse, myself, in fact all who are in any way in sympathy with the Association's work.
 

Now you know the history of his being at Laguna St. ever since the dispensary was opened, and the facts are that he has never done one thing to help the dispensary and to get our people working in connection with it. The doctors both declare this to be true, and I know it to be so. There has been a silent conspiracy on the part of some people to kill this work off, simply because it is affiliated with our organized movement and was not left in the hands of the elders of the church to manage entirely. Now, after having done all they can to kill this work, they go to the Conference Committee and state that it is doing nothing, the Branch is not doing any medical missionary work, the Dispensary is a failure, and they will take it, and make it a success financially. Now the Conference cannot do anything with the Branch, and all they can do with the Dispensary is to cut the nurse's salary; and this undoubtedly, is what they propose to do first, to see if that will force us to surrender the Dispensary into the hands of Richards, Lamb, and Company.
 

Richards is working to have the Conference do something to recognize Lamb's work as the work, and otherwise it is very evident to all of us that Richards proposes to lead an aggregation in a desperate conflict to force our organized work out of San Francisco.
 

Now, I have suspected this thing for sometime, but I would not allow myself to judge my brother. Now I have no doubt of it. Richards is against us. I write to you as a friend and as a member of our Board, asking you what advice you can give me. One of the first things Richards did when he was put on

the Conference Committee, was to stir up this agitation about San Francisco. He seems to ignore all that anyone has ever done, and all that is being done, today, and he got a Committee appointed, consisting of himself, Fero, Kellogg, Brown, I think, to come over here, and stand by him while he inaugurated his policy of destruction. This Committee was to meet with our San Francisco Committee at 10 AM Oct 19, at the church. (Editor's note: Oct 19 was a Monday.)

 

Now I don't like this war; I had enough of it back east, and as a medical student I am not going to engage in it out here. I would rather go back east and finish my medical course. I thought the Lord had led me to California, and I had longed to work for our truth in the field; but if my brethren propose to put Richards here with authority to persecute and kill off our work, I think I can be in bigger business than trying to go to medical school and fight this thing. Bro. Richards seems to have no idea of anything but his own plans and work. Now you know our Dispensary is affiliated with the State Association, and all the equipment there belongs to the State Association, or is held in trust by them as long as our work is not incorporated. Now, what shall we do about the nurse? You probably know that we are expecting Sr. Speedie to arrive any day, and take up the work she so successfully carried on single-handed and alone several years ago. If you could have read her letter you would see that it was quite a Providence which had led her to return to this field. She almost made her own work self-supporting when she was here before, Bro. Parlin informs me.
 

Now, really, Bro. White, don't you think we had just better leave the Conference out of our calculations, and take this thing as a Medical Missionary Association, and carry it through? Surely we ought not to be afraid to face a little proposition like this. It begins to seem to me that there is no such thing as a Conference working with the medical missionary work. I can't understand it. It seems that one man can get on to a Committee, and turn everything topsy-turvy. I am truly glad the St. Helena Sanitarium today does not have to fall in the hands of this present administration of affairs. If we try to continue to work with the Conference, it will mean a protracted war, and Richards has declared war, and he will fight it to a finish. For my part, I am sick and weary of this warfare. If my fellow-workers want to stand by Richards' policy of destruction, I feel like getting out of their way, and letting them have a free swing. You know this whole story from some time back. Now write me what you think I can do and ought to do in this present situation. Your letter will be treated as personal advice, and not spread before the public. I ask you to pray for us here, that we may know our duty and have courage to perform it.
 

In haste, your brother
 

W. S. Sadler


 

Personal Letter, no letterhead


From W. C. White to Sadler
Reply to above

Sanitarium, Napa Co., Cal.

Oct. 13, 1903
 

Elder W. S. Sadler

2315 Jackson St.,
San Francisco, Cal.
 

Dear Brother, --
 

I have just received your letter of October 12, telling me of some of your difficulties and perplexities, and of the meeting to be held next Monday in San Francisco. I think I shall come to Oakland next Sunday to confer with Brother H. H. Hall regarding reading matter to be prepared for our missionary conventions in November. I will try to run over Sunday evening or Monday morning and have a chat with you. I think I will arrange to attend the council of the Conference Committee.

There are a number of matters which I wish to lay before them, and this will be my most favorable opportunity. I do not think that any policy of destruction to any part of our work will be sanctioned by the California Conference Committee. They are liable to neglect certain parts of the work for a time because of lack of knowledge; but we must labor earnestly, patiently, and in hope to keep them informed regarding those parts of the work with which we are especially connected. If everybody will do the same, they will have a good understanding of what is going on.
 

With kindest regards and in great haste, I am

Yours very truly,

 

(Signed) W. C. White


 

The following was Sadler's second appeal:


On California Conference Letterhead
301 San Pablo Avenue

2315 Jackson St.
San Francisco

Oct 25, 1903
 

Elder W. C. White

Sanitarium, Cal.
 

Dear Brother,
 

I write to let you know how the battle goes on. Notwithstanding Bro. Richards' earnest declaration that he would never go into private work, before he went to bed that night he formed a partnership with Dr. Lamb to fight us. He has begun it in earnest. He launched his enterprise in church last Sabbath. Kellogg and the Conference Committee are standing right behind him. And now they propose to take Hibbard away from me, and send him to Humboldt Co., and thus, you see, by not sending me any help in the city, and leaving me all alone, I cannot attend to both churches, at once, and Richards will necessarily have the field and the spoils. (Editor's note: "In church last Sabbath would have been either Oct 17 or 24.)
 

Now Hibbard would never think of going, but he must do something for his son and daughter, for he wants to encourage them to go into the work, and he feels that he would go anywhere where they could have a chance of succeeding in the canvassing work. Now Hibbard will be satisfied to stay by me here, if his son can find work with you

folks at St. Helena. I had a talk with Bro. Bowen an Evans when they were down here, and it seems to me there is a place there that young Hibbard might fill. I think we ought to give him a show. This would satisfy Bro. Hibbard, and I think he will stand by me here. He sees the situation. In fact, he told me some things today that showed me that some of those fellows had this thing absolutely cut and dried over in Oakland. They told him so. They denied it during the meeting and then they declared it again after the meeting. Now they say if the thing can't be arranged from this side, they will arrange it by their Committee in Oakland.

 

Now, Bro. White, it is this way: If I have got to be here all alone, I have got to have an open combat with this thing. If Hibbard can stay by me here, two of us together can hold things down, and in a few months the Providence of God will develop things to open the eyes of those who do not see the real situation at present. I have written for Dr. Evans about this matter, and hope you folks will counsel together and do something to help me out in this situation. I pray God for wisdom to help me and guide me in this present difficulty and I promise to stand by our organized work, and do all I can to save our churches from being pillaged and plundered for private gain and glory.
 

Yours in haste,

 

(Signed) W. S. Sadler



 

W. C. White reply dated Oct. 25, 1903

Unfortunately, the copy of the letter in the SDA Archives is illegible down the right side. However, some sense can be obtained from the remaining text.

Sanitarium, Napa Co., ...

Oct. 25, ...
 

Elder W. S. Sadler
2315 Jackson St.,
San Francisco, Cal.
 

Dear Brother, --
 

I am much surprised at what ...

write us about the situation in San Francisco. ...

I ought to be very sorry, but if I tell you t...

truth, I must confess that I believe it is bet...

this thing to work out as it is working than ...

If you and I and Drs. Buchanan and Brighous ...

kind, trusting God to vindicate the right, ...

duty day by day in a hopeful, Christian way, ...

may work out so as to be a valuable lesson ...

people in San Francisco and throughout Califor...

 

I regard it as a matter of much imp...

that Elder Hibbard should continue his work ...

Francisco, and I will do everything I can to ...

plans to that end. I do not know Charley H...

I am not sure that the Sanitarium is the best place ...

for him, but it may be right to give the matt...

I will talk with Evans and Bowen about it.
 

Yesterday Mother had a good letter ...

and today a most excellent letter from Eld...

Lord has been working for them in Washington...
 

Yours in haste,

 

(Signed) W. ...